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Edit911 vs. Other Editing Services

Do a quick search and you’ll find thousands of editing services. When we started back in 1999, there were probably less than 100.  So how do you sort through the clutter to find the best one? By considering this comparison checklist.

Who Owns the Editing Service? Our owner is Marc D. Baldwin, PhD, whose bio, credentials, and contact information are right on the website (http://edit911.com/staff).  He also runs the Customer Service department, often answering emails and phone calls himself. The buck stops with him.  Few other editing services are up front about their ownership and fewer still have the owner himself readily available for questions and clarifications.  Dr. Baldwin puts his professional reputation and career as a college professor on the line with every single editing job his company does.

Who Does the Editing? Again, most other editing services don’t make it very clear who is editing your work, much less including staff names and bios (http://edit911.com/staff). All of Edit911’s editors are PhDs and published scholars in a wide range of fields and disciplines.  Many on the Staff have been with Edit911 for 7-10 years.

How Dependable and Responsive is Their Customer Service? Dr. Baldwin has one or two assistants, depending on the day, but for the most part he—the owner—answers emails and phone calls. He likes it that way because it ensures that his clients receive the very best treatment and service.  No client of Edit911 ever gets delayed or ignored.  All questions, concerns, or issues are immediately addressed to our clients’ complete satisfaction.

Do They Have Accountability as Members of TrustE & the Better Business Bureau of America (BBB)?  These two organizations warrant and certify that a company is reliable and trustworthy. Without their seals on the site—active and responsive when you click them—the editing service has no accountability. That is, to whom does an unhappy customer complain and report that complaint? Edit911 has perfect A+ rating with both companies, never having had one single complaint filed against it in 13 years of business.  Few other editing services are members of these organizations, much less having a flawless record of zero customer complaints.

Does the Editing Service Have a Track Record of Successful Editing? Having edited over 22,000 documents since 1999, Edit911 has hundreds of stellar Testimonials and many delighted Published Clients. Few other editing services have anywhere near the amount of enthusiastic clients singing their praises.

Do the Editors Themselves Actually Write and Publish Their Work? When you think about it, isn’t it absurd to hire an editor who doesn’t actually write anything? All of our editors are published authors of their scholarly articles, books, and novels. They also write blogs (http://edit911.com/blog), books, white papers, and articles for Edit911. Few other editing services provide any information at all about their editors, much less whether or not their editors are published authors.

Do the Editors Offer Any Mentoring and Advice as They Edit? Since almost all of Edit911’s editors are college professors, they enjoy teaching and helping their clients in any way they can. So, they explain their editing and offer constructive suggestions. These two samples of our editing reports demonstrate our editors’ level of engagement with their clients.

Is Their Editing Comprehensive? Most editing services have several different rates, depending on what you pay for. If you just pay for proofreading, they ignore all other issues, regardless of how serious they may be, because you didn’t pay for them to correct anything but basic “errors.” That’s like asking a medical doctor to just check your pulse. She may notice that your eyes are blurry and you have a fever, but she doesn’t treat those symptoms because you didn’t pay for them. We at Edit911 believe it is unethical to do anything other than everything we can possibly do for you. Therefore, we have one low rate for our full-service editing (See Services, FAQs and Order Service).

In Conclusion? The difference between Edit911 and other editing services could not be greater.            

Featured Clients: Mike Bellamy

Mike Bellamy is the author of The Essential Reference Guide to China Sourcing, owner of PassageMaker Sourcing Solutions (www.PSSchina.com) and Chairman of the (not-for-profit) China Sourcing Information Center (www.ChinaSourcingInfo.org).  Board member at Chibridge law firm and Asia Quality Focus, Mr. Bellamy moved to Asia in 1993 and has been based full-time in Shenzhen since 1999.

Recognized as an expert on China sourcing, Mike has been interviewed by the Financial Times, quoted on CNBC, and is a featured presenter for a number of high profile seminars and trade shows including Global Sources China Sourcing Fairs (HK, Shanghai, Dubai, Miami, Mumbai, Johannesburg), Boat Tech China, Rotary Foundation, US/British/French/Belgium/Luxemburg & German Chambers of Commerce, National Association of Purchasing Managers/Institute for Supply Management, Small Business Development Bureau, and the State Bar of California, among others.

Before the 2nd printing of The Essential Reference Guide to China Sourcing, Mike wanted its quality to match and reflect the quality and professionalism of his own work and career.  As he explains, “Marc and his team were both professional and affordable. Before coming to Edit911, I hired a freelancer online for my book editing.  That was a mistake as my first book went to print with spelling and formatting errors that forced me to reduce the price to liquidate my initial stock. It was a nightmare. When it came time for the second print run, I decided to do things right and find the best book editing service in the world. So I did my due diligence and after an exhaustive search, I hired Edit911. My only regret is not having found them sooner. There’s no doubt that I will use Edit911 for everything I write after this great experience with them. ”

Mike received his double degrees in Diplomacy and Economics in Washington DC and later went on to gain an International MBA from the University of South Carolina, which included a year of full-time graduate level courses at the Harbin Institute of Technology and University of International Business and Economics in Beijing. Mike also has worked with The Brock Group, an international trade and investment consulting firm managed by President Reagan’s former US Trade Representative and US Senator Bill Brock in Washington DC. After moving to China in 1993, Mike structured sourcing investments in over 250 production classifications for numerous clients.

Having mastered the China Intellectual Property (IP) and Quality Control monsters, Mike decided to develop the PassageMaker “Black Box Quality Gate” system (www.PSSchina.com) to extract the best pricing in China and protect IP without compromising quality and service. PassageMaker’s 100% US owned and operated Assembly Center in S. China serves as the client’s “black box” where inspection, final assembly, and branding takes place behind closed doors. In this fashion, Intellectual Property is physically secured and full quality inspection is conducted before product leaves China.

Edit911 is honored and excited to be working with Mike, a truly distinguished and successful international entrepreneur and businessman.

Purchase Mike’s book:  http://chinasourcinginfo.org/book/

Read more about Mike and his work:

Owner, PassageMaker Sourcing Solutions

Advisory Board Member: China Sourcing Information Center, AsiaQualityFocus,

Chibridge Law

Interview in the Financial Times: “A Foot in Both Cultures”

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/michael-mike-bellamy/8/52a/389

Email: MikeB@ChinaSourcingInfo.org

Featured Client: Darlene Nelson

Featured Clients & Their Books

Darlene Nelson, The Secret Is You

Edit911 Featured Clients and their books

A spiritually inspiring international public speaker, Darlene Nelson is loved for her high-energy empowering presentations. She is famous for her “500-year vision that what we do today affects the next five generations… so you must make it count!” Darlene creates powerful shifts in her audience’s thought process, encourages immediate change, and inspires powerful lasting teamwork.

Edit911 editing service has had the great pleasure of editing all of Darlene’s powerful and inspirational books, as well as all of her website content. Frankly, Darlene’s work doesn’t need much editing since she’s such a clear thinker and talented writer. We’ve just suggested some more precise diction choices, made some syntactical sentence improvements, caught and corrected some repetition here and there, and made sure everything she publishes is well proofed and polished.

Darlene explains why she came to Edit911 for our editing services: “I had a book that needed editing fast. I did a lot of research and decided that Edit911 was the only qualified source I trusted. Marc is so professional, always quick to answer any questions I had and his editors got the job done so fast. The work was incredible. I now do all my work with Marc and his team at Edit911. Not only is their work 5 star quality, but the price is phenomenal too. I look forward to my next five books this year with Edit911! I would be lost without them!”

Well, truthfully, a lot of people would be lost financially and spiritually without Darlene. She’s positively influenced thousands of people over the years with her books and presentations. She is a truly wonderful human being and it’s been a joy and honor to work with her these past few years.

Darlene’s website: www.thesecretisyou.com

Darlene’s Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/TheSecretIsYou

Darlene’s Email: darlene (at) thesecretisyou (dot) com

Darlene’s Bibliography of published works:

Awaken a Miracle

The Secret is You

Attitude is Everything: Scriptural Based Proof God Wants You to be 

Rich (a CD series)

 

 

8 Steps in Writing Technical Manuals

As technologies continue to develop, there is an increasing need for quality technical manuals.  Whether the product is a piece of software, hardware, mechanical device, or a technical reference on a particular subject, there is a need for your book writing skills.  Here are some guidelines and advice that can position you to be successful with your technical manual writing project.  A technical manual that is well written, properly formatted, and edited can be a selling point for the product.  For example, if your product is comparable to another, yet people comment on the poor quality of your technical manual, a consumer may choose the other product because the instructions are better.

Learn, in detail, about the item or subject matter with a hands-on approach.  Your experience using the piece of equipment, software, or involvement with the subject matter is valuable in technical manual book writing.  Use the item and identify problem areas so that you can provide a clear, yet concise, series of instructions.

Discover the skill level and technical proficiencies of your end user.  Understand your target audience.  If you are writing to the public who has no experience with the item, you will need to provide details that are easy and fun to follow.  If you are writing for advanced users, remember to refer them to other sources of information for the basic use of the item or subject.

Develop an outline for using the item from start to finish for a task, lesson, or purpose.  Your outline is a brief sketch of how you would use this item or explain the subject matter from start to finish.  For example, a technical manual on a calculator would start with explaining how to power the unit on before you would begin providing details associated with using memory or power function buttons.

Write the document with easy to read vocabulary.  Choose your vocabulary so that end users can easily read the technical manual and understand what is written.  Most often, when people need to use the manual, they seek a clear example of how to get past a particular issue with the product.

Have test users utilize the manual and give you feedback.  Find test users, people who will use the product, and let them evaluate the technical manual.  Ask these people to make notes or comments about where your manual was not clear.

Edit for content and format.  Book editing for proper grammar, clarity of presentation, flow of ideas and content, and ease of reading will help the end user find value with your technical manual.  The format, especially inclusion of a table of contents and page numbering, is critical for making this document user friendly.

Perform a secondary review with another focus or test group to determine if you have solved the problems found by the first group of test users.  After your edits are complete and the areas that were unclear have been improved, find a few new test users and give them the opportunity to use this technical manual.  Make certain you have addressed the problems discovered by the first user group.

Final Editing. Finally, edit and re-write sections that the second test group found to be problematic and then move forward with your final plan for book editing and formatting prior to publication.

Congratulations, you have successfully written and formatted your first technical manual.

The 5 Keys for Self-publishing Success

Writing a novel, short story, or technical manual is on many of our “Bucket Lists.”  With the advent of Self-publishing through Amazon, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, Apple iBooks, or many other avenues it has become easier to self-publish.  Regardless of whether or not you plan to sell millions or just a few copies to achieve fulfillment and happiness, you need to follow these five important steps to be successful in book writing and publishing.

1) Use a content editing service

Find a friend, fan, or professional editor who will read your book for content.  This person should be familiar with the genre of your book and be able to help you by suggesting areas that need improvement.  Some areas that a content editor might be able to identify as needing work include character development, storyline flow, and historical (if appropriate) accuracy.  It is also important that your content editor make sure your story is unique.

2) Develop an eye-catching cover

The first thing a potential reader sees for your book is the cover.  As people scroll through eBooks or on bookshelves, the cover is what catches the eye.  If your cover telegraphs the content and excitement of your story then people will pick up a copy and start looking in more detail to determine if this is a story worth their time or money. Choose a designer wisely and budget for a good one. Elance is a good way to find freelancer designers, as is Behance.

3) Have a Table of Contents

With a Table of Contents, it is easy for people to see what your book offers.  Interesting chapter titles or descriptions of the technical chapters helps the reader immediately assess the value of your book.  In our fast-paced society, a book without a Table of Contents might be set aside because it would take to long to determine the value of the book.

4) Employ an excellent book editing service

If you have spent any time reading book reviews you will notice that many reviewers comment on spelling errors, typos, and poor grammar.  It is critical to the success of your work that you have the book edited.  A good book editor will find punctuation issues, spelling and grammatical errors, formatting problems, and he or she can help you keep readers happy and providing you with four and five star reviews.  Poorly edited books often receive one star reviews and this can absolutely stop any sales of your book.

5) Write a catchy book description

After the cover grabs the potential readers attention, your book description needs to convince them that your book is going to be a wonderful read.  You must tease the reader, activate his/her imagination, and capture his/her attention.  Often a beta reader or a book editor can help you write the book description.

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Edit911 is the world’s finest online proofreading and editing service. Our PhD editors are experts in book editing, dissertation editing, and other document, copy and text editing. Click here to get an instant quote for our editing services, or visit the contact page to discuss your project with us!

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11 Steps in Writing a Publishable Scientific Research Paper


A rewarding yet difficult aspect of graduate work is writing that first scientific research paper to be published in a peer reviewed journal. The reward comes from knowing that you have the opportunity to tell a story (at least in part) relevant to your thesis or dissertation hypothesis. How to actually develop the paper and put your story into words, tables, and figures can be the difficult part.

It is important to remember that the peer reviewed scientific research paper may not be in the same format as your thesis or dissertation chapter. Your goal should be to get the scientific research paper published and then you can concern yourself with the necessary thesis editing and formatting to prepare this work for inclusion into your graduate thesis.

My first scientific paper draft consumed many hours with little or no success. I would write a few sentences, then edit, wordsmith, and check grammar so that every word was perfect. I lacked any idea of how to go about presenting my scientific data. Sure, I was experienced with writing essays and graduate research papers for class, but this was different. Now with over 30 peer reviewed papers published, I have a system that makes this process easier. Within three days of gathering the final pieces of data, I can have a draft document into the hands of my colleagues and this is how I succeed.

Know the preferred presentation style of your colleagues.

Take the time to read a few papers written by your major advisor and collaborators. Understand what styles and journals they most often choose and how they go about laying out the data and the story. If your work developed from a grant proposal, review that document and think about the hypothesis. In the beginning, your advisor and collaborators are going to use what is most familiar to them and you will have to prove yourself competent in writing peer reviewed scientific papers before you can develop your own style. Have the relevant literature easily accessible as you write.

Collect and present your data.

Often we want to start with the introduction. That is the wrong approach. Start with compiling your data and putting it all into tables, charts, and figures. Have your data in nicely formatted and easy to review “pictures.”

Write the Results section.

Once your data is presented nicely, write the results associated with each figure, table, or chart. Do not just reiterate what is presented, but help the reader understand the relevance and connectedness of the data. This is where you succeed in walking the reader through your data, just as you would tell a story.

Write the Materials and Methods.

Once you have the data presented in the Results, it is time to write the Materials and Methods. Describe how you performed the experiments. Refer to previous literature and be succinct. In your thesis or dissertation writing, you can add extra details.

Draft five or ten key points about your work.

Put into words the key ideas you are hoping to present with this paper. These do not need to be lengthy paragraphs but rather statements that summarize the crucial elements of your work.

Share the paper with your collaborators.

Now is the time to have collaborators, your advisor, or knowledgeable friends review this work to see if everyone agrees on the selected data and the key points. Ask for quick feedback and select the scientific journal you will submit your work to for publication.

Revise based on collaborator suggestions.

With collaborator suggestions, you can then perform some research paper editing. Edit the document to address the issues or ideas brought up by your collaborators. With your target journal in mind, this is the time to go back and make sure your tables, figures, and charts are in the proper format as specified by the journal.

Write your Discussion.

After you have edited the Results and Materials and Methods sections based on collaborator input, write your Discussion. You can use the five or 10 points you developed earlier as the basis for the discussion.

Write your Introduction.

With the rest of the document prepared, write your Introduction.

Put together your References Section.

Finally, format your references per the guidelines of the target journal.

To Be Certain of its Excellence, Hire an Editing Service for a Final Check.

Once all the above is completed, you must now make sure all the collaborators and your advisor read and comment. Edit and make necessary changes as suggested by the rest of the team and then write the abstract. If you’re not 100% confident in your paper’s excellence, employ a professional editing service staffed by PhDs in your discipline to go through it one more time for you. Edit911 has edited over 1200 scientific papers for publication.

Featured Clients: Niklas Modig & Pär Åhlström

Featured Clients & Their Books:

This Is Lean: Resolving the Efficiency Paradox, by Niklas Modig & Pär Åhlström

Edit911 Book Editing Featured Clients

When Dr. Pär Åhlström (Chair of the Business Administration department at the Stockholm School of Economics) approached me requesting Edit911’s book editing services on This is Lean, I was excited by the prospect of working with him and his co-author Dr. Niklas Modig. Already the #1 best-swelling management book in Sweden, This is Lean had rapidly earned the reputation as the definitive, cutting-edge authority on not only management in general, but the healthcare industry, social welfare, organizational structure, and corporate leadership as well. This is Lean is used by companies such as Scania and Ericsson, all major hospitals, the social insurance agency and many others as a key part of their transformation efforts. It has become a tool for organization development, as it helps organizations create a common mindset and shared understanding.

So why would such successful authorities in their field—such highly praised and accomplished professionals with the #1 best-selling book in its genre—come to Edit911 for editing services? Because they wanted to reprint the book for a wider European audience and perceived a need for yet another round of careful editing, customized toward assuring that all the language complied with the rules of UK English.

After consulting with Dr. Åhlström in numerous emails, we came to fully understand his goals and objectives for our book editing:  “ A first challenge,” Dr. Åhlström explains, “was the fact that we worked under intense time pressure. Yet, Edit911 managed to deliver very fast service and with a very high quality and attention to detail.”

“Even more important than the speed,” Dr. Åhlström continues, “the key challenge was to help us reach our goal of making the text really readable. We wanted the language to be more ‘charming’ than ’formal’. We wanted a personal tone and active language. Even though the book is based on sound academic thinking and theories, we did not want it to have an academic tone and style. We wanted it as far away as possible from the traditional academic tone and style. We also did not mind, and indeed encouraged, a personal touch. We did not want a passive voice in the text. We also tried to build in humor in the text. Edit911 achieved—indeed exceeded—all of our expectations and objectives with their extraordinary editing.”

Once we completed our rounds of editing, Dr. Åhlström said this about our work: “We are exceedingly happy with your editing services, and will no doubt come back with more (and also recommend your editing service to colleagues here at the department).”

You may read more about and order This is Lean at www.thisislean.com

You may contact Dr. Åhlström directly at: par.ahlstrom at gmail dot com

 

How To Use Quotations In Dissertations

Using quotations in a Dissertation

Dissertations serve a two-fold purpose.  They are the final projects for doctoral candidates, the last step before degree conferral, in which these individuals may show their knowledge of their specific areas of interest and of their ability to identify and propose solutions to problems within their fields.  Dissertations are simultaneously the transition from students to contributors within their fields by engaging in original research and adding to the body of knowledge.

In writing dissertations, authors must demonstrate their thorough understanding of their particular areas of study.  One way to show that understanding is through the use of quotations garnered from previously written works in their field or in related areas.  However, overuse or inappropriate use of quotations may have the opposite effect, suggesting a lack of understanding.  Therefore, authors must use quotations judiciously.

The number and length of quotations may vary from one academic field to another.  For example, students examining Shakespeare’s use of figurative language in his various plays will need to include specific quotations from the plays for each type of figurative language discussed.  Such quotations may range from one word to several lines.  Students conducting qualitative studies based on extensive interviews of research participants will also need to use numerous quotations from those interviews to support whatever themes they discover through their analysis of those data.  However, inclusion of quotations from other experts in the field of study should be handled differently.

In the proposal, concept paper, and the final dissertation, candidates must demonstrate their familiarity with the research in their field.  This is the primary purpose of chapter 2 in most dissertations.  Some of that background material is also revealed in the first chapter to set up the problem and to show the significance of the study.  Additional background material is revealed in chapter 3 to show an understanding of the chosen research methodology and its appropriateness for the study in question.

In these chapters, authors are not only giving information pertinent to their studies but also showing their ability to grasp ideas, analyze material for its strengths and weaknesses, and synthesize material from various sources to create the foundation for their particular study.  Therefore, quotations should be used only when that is the best and clearest way to provide information to the reader.

Consider the following two examples:

Example 1:  According to John Smith, “The best thing about this concept is that it is easy to understand compared with other concepts in this field.”  He went on to say that “scientists will be able to use this new knowledge to create new technology for this field” and that “people will embrace this technology very quickly.”  Therefore, “companies that wish to increase their profitability” should begin investing in “this new scientific venture” so that they “will not lose out” on this “golden opportunity.”

Example 2:  According to John Smith, this new concept is easier to understand compared to others in the same field.  Because of this, new technology will be forthcoming, which people will be eager to purchase.  Therefore, he advises businesses to invest in this research as soon as possible.  Failure to do so may result in their decreased profitability.

Although not taken directly from actual dissertations, the formats of these two examples shows what edits often find in dissertations.  Both examples deal with the same topic and make the same essential points.  Yet the second one clearly shows the writer understands the material drawn from John Smith’s work; the first does not.  The first one is simply a copy of John Smith’s words interspersed with innocuous connecting phrases.  The writer in the first example has not attempted to analyze, synthesize, or summarize the meaning of Smith’s words.  Instead, the writer has found material that fits the topic being discussed and quotes from that material, expecting the reader to figure out what it all means.  Unfortunately, many candidates use this type of format.  Variations include inserting block quote after block quote, often from the same source, and quoting single words that, in and of themselves, hold no special significance.

Authors who use quotes judiciously reduce verbiage and redundancy, demonstrate their thorough grasp of the material, and often show the connection of their original research to the rest of the field more clearly.  If they include quotations at all, they do so to emphasis a particular point.  Using quotations in this way is ultimately more powerful.

After deciding to include quotations, authors must also handle them correctly.  The following points are not all inclusive but represent some of the more common problems editors find in dissertations.

1.     Introduce most quotations.  Seldom should a paragraph begin with a direct quotation.  Many university style guides require authors to introduce quotations, although there are exceptions.  However, when in doubt, error on the side of introducing the quotation to prevent any misinterpretation of the material.  Use one of the following constructions:

    1. a full sentence with the quotation placed after a colon;
    2. a short introductory phrase such as “according to” followed by the person’s name, a comma, and the quotation (e.g., According to Smith, “Businesses must take advantage of this golden opportunity”);
    3. the person’s name, an appropriate verb such as “stated,” and the quotation (e.g., David stated, “I am hungry”).

 

2.     Reproduce the quotation accurately.  The quotation should be written the same way it is written in the source from which it is being taken.  However, there are exceptions to this rule, depending on the style guide candidates are required to follow.  For example, writers may correct minor grammatical problems within a quotation as long as those corrections do not change the meaning or are not needed to demonstrate a particular point.  This avoids overuse of [sic] to show that the author knows the errors are there and makes it easier for the reader to follow.  It also acknowledges that the errors may or may not have been in the original quotation but are the result of transcription by a third party.

 

3.     Alter the capitalization of the first word of the quotation to fit the syntax of the sentence in which it is placed.  Generally, if the quotation follows direct attribution, the first word is capitalized (e.g., David said, “He goes to my school”).  However, if the word that is included, the first word is not capitalized unless it is a proper noun (e.g., David said that he goes to my school).  If the quotation is a block quotation and comes after a colon, capitalize the first word (see Example 1).  If it is a block quotation used as a continuation of the sentence, do not capitalize the first word unless it is a proper noun (see Example 2).

Example 1.

He recited the Gettysburg Address:

Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

 

Example 2. 

The new law states that

any person entering another individual’s domicile without the express permission of that individual is trespassing and is subject to the fines and levies as defined in Section 3 subsection 1 paragraph 1.

 

4.     Use appropriate punctuation.  Be sure to punctuation the quotation correctly as it is used within the dissertation.

  1. All run-in quotations must begin and end with quotation marks.  Block quotations are not placed within quotation marks.
  2. Periods and commas always go inside the closing quotation marks (e.g., Patty bought “The Isle of Man,” the bestselling mystery novel).
  3. Other forms of punctuation go outside the closing quotation marks unless they are part of the actual quotation (e.g., Did he just say, “I’m going home”?  I asked, “What do you have for lunch?”)
  4. If a quotation contains a quotation, be sure to enclose the secondary quotation in single quotation marks (e.g., He stated, “I have just read the story, ‘The Scarlet Ibis,’ for the tenth time”).  Note that in block quotations, secondary quotations are punctuated with double quotation marks, not single, because the doubles are not used to define the beginning and ending of the major quotation.

 

5.     Use ellipses correctly.  Ellipses (. . .) are used to show the omission of wording from a quotation.  However, ellipses are not needed if an author chooses to delete the first portion of a sentence being quoted or the last part of a sentence being quoted.  Only material deleted from the middle of a quotation is noted by an ellipsis.

  1. Correct: He began reciting the Gettysburg address:  “Four score and seven years ago . . . perish from the earth.”
  2. Incorrect: He began reciting: “. . . and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal . . . .”

 

6.     Use attributions correctly. Here, attributions refer to the verbs used to indicate how the speaker is speaking (e.g., said, stated, noted, etc.).  Be sure the verb used is possible.  For example, a person can shout words but cannot grimace words.  In dissertations, stick with simple verbs that allow the reader to move into the quotation as quickly as possible without having to consider if the verb makes sense.

 

7.     Cite, cite, cite. Citations are attributions of a different kind.  Be sure that each quotation is cited accurately.  Citations should include the author of the source, the year of publication, and the page number in the source on which the wording may be found.  Although it is possible that a quotation may split between two contiguous pages (e.g., pp. 9–10), seldom will a quotation span more than two pages unless it is an extremely long block quotation.  (If it is, see the previous discussion about appropriate use of quotations.)

 

8.     Avoid single word quotations.  Generally, these are terms and should be italicized in their first use in text and not punctuated at all in subsequent use in the paper.  If a word was coined by the author of the source being quoted, incorporate a phrase or a sentence in which the word appears as a quote rather than using the single word.  This assists in eliminating the tendency to place the term in quotation marks every time it is used in the paper.

 

Finally, remember that overuse of almost anything minimizes its effectiveness.  This is as true with quotations as with any other writing technique.  Use quotations sparingly.  Be sure that the information cannot be conveyed as effectively or as accurately through paraphrasing, summarizing, or synthesizing it with other material.  Be accurate, use appropriate punctuation, and cite the source properly. If you’re in need of assistance, consider hiring an excellent dissertation editing service, such as Edit911, to check everything for you.

 

Featured Clients: Erich K. Ritter, PhD

Shark-Human Interaction by Erich K. Ritter, PhD

Erich K. Ritter, PhD, is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading authorities on shark behavior.  His comprehensive study Shark-Human Interaction includes a thorough discussion of his ADORE-SANE concept that details how divers, swimmers, and snorkelers can greatly enhance their ability to safely interact with any shark species under a wide-variety of conditions.

When Dr. Ritter approached Edit911 for our book editing services several years ago, we were honored and excited to accept him as a client. We had already edited some parts of his book in chapter form and as articles he later published in scholarly journals. Our task was to help him assemble his ideas into an organized structure and to assure that the transitions from paragraph to paragraph and chapter to chapter were smooth and effective. Working closely with Dr. Ritter, several of our science editors performed very close manuscript editing to help him realize his vision of a definitive, highly authoritative, eminently readable, and practical guide to the subject.

Dr. Ritter explains why he feels he needed editing and how Edit911 has assisted him: “I learned long time ago that no matter how the good scientific results are, they mean nothing during a reviewing process should the language not be satisfactory. Every non-native English speaker knows what kind of frustration comes along with it. Some of the remarks I have received on my papers in the past were often quite personal and once or twice even nasty. Often, I felt that the reviewer did not even try to see what the meaning of the paper was but concentrated solely on how the paper was written. In two cases, the reviewers knew me (since I was the only one working in this field), yet they still rejected my papers based on their style. One reviewer even added, “…since it is known that he is not a native English speaker….”

Dr. Ritter continues: “Not having grown up in an English speaking world is a constant handicap for most of us who must publish in peer-reviewed journals, and we often dread the beginning of another paper, knowing that no matter how long we sit in front of a paper and try our best to make it readable, someone else has to take over and correct it. Of course, there are often colleagues who are willing to help but even for native English speakers it can be a challenge, and although everything might stylistically be correct when done editing, the wording might still not feel right.”

“So I started to shop around for professional, scientific editing, and figured if they charge money for it I will get the results needed. But after testing a few, they were not worth the money. Then I found Edit911, and my papers finally made it through the reviewing process. What keeps impressing me the most with Edit911 is how they cut my writing down to fewer sentences, enhance the flow of the wording, and do so with impeccable scientific precision. I have since recommended Edit911’s editing services to others who face the same problem as I do.”

Dr. Ritter’s book is fascinating to read and extremely valuable for anyone who enters the oceans of the world—the sharks’ domain. We are proud of how his book turned out and extremely gratified that he entrusted his groundbreaking study to our book editing service.

Shark-Human Interaction, published by SharkSchool, is available from Amazon: http://amzn.to/UTPKaf

 

Dr. Ritter’s Bio:

Dr. Ritter earned his Ph.D. from Zurich University in “Behavioral Ecology” as its only professional shark-human interaction specialist. He did his post-doc at the University of Miami’s Rosenschiel School. He has taught field courses for students, naturalists and divers in the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, the Maldives, Egypt, Mexico, Costa Rica, South Africa and Hawaii. He conducts his field research primarily in the Northern Abacos, Bahamas at the “Shark Education & Research Center” (SERC).

Dr. Ritter is also the head of the SharkSchool™, an organization that teaches divers, snorkelers, rescue swimmers and others how to interact with sharks, what to look for when entering the water, and most importantly how to feel safe among sharks. He functions as a case investigator of the Shark Research Institute’s GSAF (Global Shark Attack File). He is also the chairman of SAVN™, the Shark Accident Victim Network, and non-for-profit organization to help shark victims. He has given lectures worldwide and was guest on many different TV shows, including a quick appearance in the movie SharkWater.

 

Dr. Ritter’s Writings (all edited by Edit911):

Scholarly Papers Published:

Ritter, E. K. (2012). A rare use of a shark’s pectoral fin? Scooping off a sharksucker from the flank. Open Fish Science Journal, 5: 57-59.

Ritter, E. K. & Amin, R. W. (2012). Effect of human body position on the swimming behavior of bull sharks, Carcharhinus leucas. Society and Animal, 20: 225-235.

Ritter, E. & L. V. C. Compagno (2012). Clasper flaring: maintenance behavior, or a normally hidden feature of male whitetip reef sharks, Triaenodon obesus? Open Fish Science Journal, in press.

Amin, R., Ritter, E. & P. Kennedy (2012). A geospatial analysis of shark attack rates for the east coast of Florida: 1994-2009. Fresh Behavioral Physiology, 45 (3): 185-198.

Amin, R., Ritter, E. & L. Cossette (2012). An investigation of shark density and attack rates in California. Journal of Environment and Ecology, in press.

Ritter, E. (2011). Use of sand ripples to enhance chafing in Caribbean reef sharks (Carcharhinus perezi) and blacktip sharks (Carcharhinus limbatus). Bulletin of Marine Science, 87 (3): 413-419.

Scholarly Papers Submitted:

Ritter, E. (2013). Coasting of pelagic thresher sharks, Alopias pelagicus, in comparison to oceanic whitetip shark, Carcharhinus longimanus, and the blue shark, Prionace glauca, two other species of the same ecomorphotype. Journal of Fish Biology.

Ritter, E.K, Amin, R. W. & A. Zambesi (2013). Do lunar cycles influence shark attacks? Open Fish Science Journal.

Books:

Ritter, E. (2012). Shark-Human Interaction. Situations Findings Recommendations. SharkSchool Publishing.

Available at http://www.sharkschool.com/shark-human-interaction/

 

You can read even more about Dr. Ritter and his work at these links:

Shark School: http://www.sharkschool.com/shark-human-interaction/

Global Shark Attack File: http://www.sharkattackfile.net/

Shark Research Institute: http://www.sharks.org/

Shark Accident Victim (Dr. Ritter is the Chair): http://www.sharkvictimnetwork.org

 

You may contact Dr. Ritter directly:

786-301-3310

erichritter@att.net

erichritter@sharkschool.com

The Art of Life: A Review of Seth Godin’s The Icarus Deception

Seth Godin's new book The Icarus Deception

The Icarus Deception is yet another inspirational, informative, and dazzling Seth Godin manifesto and self-help book. As in many of his previous books, Godin delights with insights on how to succeed in business (“…our success turns not on being the low-price leader but on being the high-trust leader.”), while self-actualizing and maximizing your potential and happiness in all areas of life.

The essence of Godin’s multi-layered thesis is that life is an art form and everyone is an artist. “Art is not a gene or a specific talent,” says Godin. “Art is an attitude.” We’re not all painters or musicians or graphic designers, but we should all use our tools and skills to be artists. By that, Godin means we should strive to be the best we can be at what we do and who we are: “Your work is your art (and vice versa).”

Whether we tend bar, fix cars, build houses, or run a day care center—no matter what we do—we should do it better and care more about it, and others, than anyone else. When we do, we benefit both ourselves and those who experience our artistic work, because people crave connections with people who care. “We embrace the humanity in those around us, particularly as the rest of the world appears to become less human and more cold. Who will you miss? That is who you are listening to.”

These aren’t new ideas, necessarily. Godin’s influences and references run far and wide—from Zen, sociology, psychology, and philosophy; from Plato (the implied Platonic ideal) to Jobs (the meshing of art and technology), and Emerson (self-reliance and Transcendentalism) to Pirsig (the motorcycle we maintain is ourselves).

Yet, Godin’s metonymic intellect strides from one synthetic adage and observation to another with the grace and fluidity of a racehorse. His style is both muscular and light, alternating from an almost pugnacious tone that challenges and dares the reader to a sweet and encouraging grandfatherly voice that loves his family—his tribe—and wants only the best for them. I always feel like I’m on a rollercoaster reading his books: they’re a fun, crazy, fast, exhilarating, and not a little bit daunting ride.

As we know, Icarus flew too high and died, but what many don’t know about the story—because of the deception forwarded and publicized by the industrial, corporate, conformity machine that repressed the rest of the story—is that if he had flown too low, he’d have crashed into the ocean and drowned. So the allegorical moral to the story is that we should, indeed, fly as high as we possibly can, just short of flaming out.

So how does one achieve greatness while minimizing the risks of utter failure? By creating art. Always be creating. And always be creating relationships through your art. “Art is the unique work of a human being, work that touches another.” True quality is customer/client/friend/acquaintance aware, driven, and accomplished because “people want your humanity, not your discounts.” If you make cabinets, make cabinets people will be amazed by. If you treat patients, treat every patient as you would your own child. If you clean carpets, clean them as if your own baby will be crawling on them. “When we treat the people around us with dignity, we create an entirely different platform for the words we utter and the plans we make.”

Clearly at the heart of Godin’s books is his enormous heart. One of today’s greatest shining lights, he inspires, he instructs, he pats you on the back—saying, “You can do it!”—and kicks you in the ass—saying, “What are you waiting for?”

Ultimately, Godin professes tough love for all and antipathy for those grounded in apathy. “We embrace the humanity in those around us, particularly as the rest of the world appears to become less human and more cold. Who will you miss? That is who you are listening to.”

www.SethGodin.com

http://edit911.com