Misc. Helpful Advice

8 Great Reasons to Journal

In our fast-paced high-tech world, journaling may be one of the best ways to gain perspective and peace of mind. Whether you write in a beautiful leather-bound notebook or on the latest tablet, expressing your thoughts can lead to insights that you might not discover otherwise—or, at least, not as quickly.

1. Journaling allows us to reflect.

The fast pace of our society often prevents us from taking time to think and to see exactly where we fit in to what is going on around us. Journaling helps us slow down to consider who we are, what we’ve done, and where we want to go.

2. Journaling allows us to discover who we are.

We are far more complex than most of us allow anyone to see. We often don’t even know ourselves very well. Journaling lets us see the thoughts and ideas locked in our subconscious minds. The body-mind connection required to write helps us express those inner thoughts.

3. Have a problem? Journal.

Writing can help us sort through possible solutions to the sticky problems in our lives, the ones that don’t have neat answers immediately identifiable. We can develop a variety of possible solutions, from the sublime to the ridiculous, and then choose the one most likely to resolve the situation.

4. Journaling lets us say whatever we want to say.

Sometimes we just have to vent. But venting publically can create more problems than it resolves. Journaling helps us acknowledge those feelings in a way that doesn’t hurt us or other people. We can always tear out the page or delete the words from the screen (just don’t save first). Once out of our systems, we can look at the situation more calmly and move on.

5. Journaling releases tension and stress.

The act of writing slows us down, which helps us relax and breathe. We get the things that are bugging us out in the open, even if only for our eyes, and that helps us deal with them. Writing also helps us put things into perspective, which reduces stress and anxiety as well.

6. Journaling unlocks our creativity.

Feeling blocked? Not sure what to do next? Write. Just put pen to paper or fingers on keyboards and write. No editing, no proofreading, no second thoughts. Just get whatever is in your head out. Make it visible and see where it leads. What seems whacky is often the seed of genius; but if you never express it, the seed can’t grow.

7. Journaling helps us express gratitude.

Keeping a journal of blessings is an easy way to see all the good that is happening in our lives. It allows us to focus on the little things that we overlook in the organized chaos of our world. The smell of wood smoke on a crisp fall evening, the sweet taste of a the first strawberry of spring, the sight of a puppy trying to pick up the paper to bring to his owner—recalling and recording these little events of the day can let us see that even in the middle of the worst day possible, rays of hope exit.

8. Journaling is a way to capture and preserve who we are.

By journaling, we create a first-person narrative of our lives, a narrative both we and our families will find interesting and enlightening in years to come. Journals have always been a source of information, a way of seeing how people who lived during various historical periods actually felt and what their daily lives were really like. Our journals can do the same. Journals also allow us to relive periods of our lives, to see how we have grown and changed, to reflect on the impact of decisions made long ago.

So start journaling! You will be amazed at what you will discover about you, your life, and the world around you.

  1. Tell your story for posterity

  2. Measure progress

  3. Get organized

Types of Journals

  1. Diary

  2. Blessings

  3. Prayer

  4. Plans

  5. Character sketches

  6. Life story

  7. Wishes and Dreams

5 Keys to Writing a Great Press Release

Whether you’re an entrepreneur, business leader, non-profit organizer, community activist, inventor, or author, at some point you’ll need to write a press release. A Press Release is the perfect tool that lets the outside world communicate with those who distribute news. A well-written press release is an effective tool that contributes to your promotional success.

It’s important to remember that your press release will be edited or changed somewhat. A press release in and of itself is not news–rather, it carries news. Your goal in sending a press release is to gain attention and have people contact you for more information on your idea, concept, or product.

1) The title must attract attention.


Your title needs to tease at the news in your press release. A title must get your audience to read the entire press release to learn more about your news.

Here are good and bad examples of titles:
“Company X completes a major merger that will revolutionize cell phone access” checkmark
“Company X just completed a merger” x

“Company ABC Exceeds Growth Expectations and launches two new products” checkmark
“Company ABC announces earnings and product news” x

2) Be succinct.

Joey from Friends pointing and nodding like "this guy gets it"
A good press release is approximately 500 words or less. You want to explain who you or your company is, share your news, add a quotation about the news, and direct the reader to contact information so that he/she can learn more about you or your company.

3) Have a great quotation that people can appreciate.

Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson clapping in awe
Many press releases share a quotation from a company leader, industry partner, or end user. You want to make sure that the quotation means something to your audience. Quotations should be short, want the reader to find the person delivering the quotation, and ask him/her more about the idea.

Here is a good and bad example of a quotation:

“Proving the idea before spending on capital equipment will be a huge benefit to most emerging technology companies. Our goal is to save companies anywhere between 30 and 50% of the normal operating costs associated with proving technology.” check mark

“Many companies can spend lots of money trying to prove a technology. In most cases, that money is wasted, although in a few that works out okay. We have really studied this issue and have a solution that we are marketing that will help companies save money. For each company the amount of money they will save using our technology will vary but we think they will find the savings to be compelling enough to purchase our technology.” x

The first quotation is short and makes the reader want to learn more about this idea. The second quotation is long, does not say much of anything, and does not grab the attention of the reader. In fact, the second quotation sounds confusing and unprepared. If you have the time to write a quality press release, you also need to make certain the quotations are well developed.

4) Make it easy for your audience to contact you.

Kim Possible "You can call me, or...beep me. You know, if you wanna reach me."
This seems obvious but many companies forget to put their direct information on the press release. People want to be able to easily access your website, email you, or call you on the phone so that they can learn more about the subject of the press release.

5) Make sure there are no typos or grammatical errors and have a clean format.

Perfection

You must put your best foot forward with the press release. Grammar errors and typos are a bad reflection on you and your company. Make sure you have at least two people proofread and edit your press release. If the press release is critical to your success, consider having it professionally edited. A poorly written press release will keep people from spreading your news. Any reputable news agency (or website), publication, or public relations firm will avoid sharing your information if there are typos and grammar errors. Format is important, so make sure the font is the same type and size for the text and that you have square margins.

Follow these five recommendations and you are sure to have success with your press release.

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Improve Your Writing with a Little Fan Fiction

Fan-written fiction (fanfic) means taking a story someone else wrote and making your own version of it without requiring permission or seeking profit. It’s usually done by amateurs, though some pros go at it too. While you can argue it’s been going on informally since the beginning of storytelling, modern fanfic is mostly posted on the Internet.

And, lately, fanfic is finally getting some respect as a sort of underground writing movement. It’s sedition against the corporate ownership of stories. It’s personal expression gone wild. It’s exploration of modern culture motivated by shared interest and decidedly not overseen by The Man.

More to the point for this blog, it’s also a good way to work on your writing.

Limitations

 

Let’s get it out of the way that I’m talking about using fanfic as a writing exercise, not about writing fanfic for the rest of your life (though you certainly can if you want to). Writing fanfic helps with some things, but it isn’t a good way to work on the incredibly important business of establishing plot, character, or setting. After all, those are what you steal when you write fanfic.

Figure Out What Inspires You & Copy It

People write fanfic because they feel inspired by the original material, whether it’s Star Trek, The Simpsons, Harry Potter, The Catcher in the Rye, or March of the Penguins. Fanfic means trying to continue those qualities you feel inspired by, and this can help you figure out who you are as an author.

I’m not going to resist the metaphor of the aspiring painter who makes copies of the masters to learn techniques and to see why and how things work. Put Indiana Jones or Elizabeth Bennet at a dinner table (or on a battlefield) and see if you can keep them in character with your own words. Take the Tolkien universe and add your own monster. Is it as scary as the orcs? Write your own mystery with Sherlock Holmes. Can you come up with an appropriately clever crime?

Improve Your Dialogue

This one’s a beaut. A problem almost all writers struggle with, especially new writers, is making their characters sound like different people. I highly recommend reading dialogue, others’ and yours, out loud. Writing dialogue for someone you can clearly hear in your head (say Mary from Downton Abbey or Tony Stark/Iron Man or the Wicked Witch of the West) can help you learn to stay in character with every word.

For extra points, learn to do with without catch phrases. No “Beam me up, Mr. Scot” or “Vodka martini, shaken not stirred.”

Get Feedback

Writing can just be so damn lonely. When you write fanfic, you don’t have to post it for others to see, but you certainly can. It’s free and it’s fun. And no, you don’t have to join any sort of cult.

The best place these days is Archive of Our Own (https://archiveofourown.org), an open-source, non-commercial, non-profit archive for fan fiction run by the Organization for Transformative Works. You just register and post your story with the online template. If people like it, they can give it “kudos.” And if they really like it, you’ll get comments.

If you do want to join an online community, there are many on Twitter (https://www.twitter.com) and Tumblr (https://www.tumblr.com). There’s also Live Journal (http://www.livejournal.com), which allows large posts and encourages things like fanfic challenges and hooking up writers with “beta-readers” (people who will read your work before you post and give you feedback).

Isn’t Fanfic All Kinky and Weird and Stuff?

Yeah, yeah. People on the outside of anything are only interested in the weird bits, but, believe it or not, a lot of fanfic out there reads like mainstream TV episodes or movie sequels. While to a lot of people “fanfic” instantly equates to “Kirk and Spock get it on,” there’s really every variety you can think of, and quite frankly more.

In fact, it’s a little overwhelming at first. That’s why most fanfic archives have “warnings” and “tags” so that you know exactly what sort of thing you’re going to read. You can also use these yourself to tell the world what sort of story you’ve written and thus attract the audience you’re looking for. Here’s a brief into:

Gen

Short for general audience (aka G-rated, no sex, no major violence, etc.). At Archive of Our Own, 334,424 of the current 1,341,499 stories available are tagged “Gen.”

Het

This means the story will feature a relationship, most likely romantic, between a man and a woman. “Het” by no means equals “Gen.”

Slash

Yeah, let’s get it out of the way. It’s a romantic pairing between two people of the same sex.

Crack

This one’s actually my favorite. It means a story written like the writer’s on crack. Read (or write) about your favorite characters as cats, or dogs, or Martians, or Girl Scout Cookies. Done poorly, these stories can be pretty lame. Done well, they can be awesome.

Fluff

A light and sweet story.

Dark

Not fluff.

PWP

Stands for “plot, what plot?” Usually a sex scene, but sometimes a gag or just thinking out loud.

AU

Stands for “alternative universe.” This means a story where the characters from one fictional universe (say, that high school in Glee) are put into another universe (say, one where everyone’s a vampire).

IMWWALF

Stands for “improving my writing with a little fanfic.” Hm, well, this one isn’t actually a standard tag yet, but it could be!