The Edit911 Blog

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Twin Peaks

One of our favorite writers of all time is David Lynch. With principal filming for the new Twin Peaks starting this week, we’re celebrating the rebirth of this cult classic television show. Are you as excited as we are about its return? After re-watching the entire series we discovered some fun facts that other fans of the show might not have caught on to.

david lynch twin peaks trivia

1. There were a ton of parents of famous actors on the show. Donna Hayward’s mom (played by Mary Jo Deschanel) is Zooey & Emily Deschanel’s mother. Having been a successful actress herself, she helped launch her daughters’ extremely successful careers in Hollywood.

Zooey Emily Mary Jo Deschanel

2. Zooey & Emily’s dad, Caleb Deschanel, also directed a few episodes. Caleb & Mary Jo met on another David Lynch project.

caleb deschanel

3. Norma Jennings (played by Peggy Lipton) is Rashida Jones’ mom. Rashida is known as Quincey Jones’ daughter, but what many don’t know is that her mom is also a great actress.

rashidajones

4. Jake & Maggie Gyllenhaals dad, Stephen Gyllenhaal, directed 1 episode.

Jake and Maggie Gyllenhaal

5. Warren Frost, who played Doc Hayward, was Mark Frost’s dad (the producer of the show).

warren frost

6. Amber Tamblyn is Russ Tamblyn’s (Dr. Jacoby) daughter. She’s appeared with her dad at Twin Peaks events.

amber-tamblyn-and-russ-tamblyn

7. The timeframe for the first 2 seasons was only 28 days. It only took Coop and the Bookhouse Boys 15 days to solve Laura’s murder and there were only 13 more days before the final scene of the series.

bookhouse-boys

8. There is a Twin Peaks Festival held yearly, plus a Twin Peaks magazine called “Wrapped In Plastic” and many of the actors and crew involved in the series attend Twin Peaks events frequently held around the world.

twin peaks festival fans

9. The haunting, powerful score behind Twin Peaks was created in 20 minutes by Lynch and Angelo Badalamenti.

lynch badalamenti

10. Damon Lindelof has stated that LOST was heavily influenced by David Lynch/Twin Peaks. We thought that scene with the donkey wheel in the ice cave with Ben was awfully similar to the scene in owl cave!

lost twin peaks

 

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

6 Keys to Writing a Good Newsletter

A newsletter is often distributed to share information among people with common interests.
Schools, clubs/organizations, social service groups, and others share information that is of
interest and relevance to the target audience. Some newsletters arrive in the mail while others come electronically. No doubt, you likely receive one or more newsletters and at some point, you will have the opportunity to be involved in writing and distributing news for your favorite group. Here are six keys to writing a good newsletter.

1. Know your audience and get their interest.

 

Take a few moments to decide what topics will interest your audience. Make sure that the content you are putting in the newsletter will connect with the readers on a personal level. Use the six questions of who, what, when, where, why, and how to give your newsletter versatility. Each article needs to give relevant information that will keep your audience interested. You may have to do a little bit of research on the topic(s) in the newsletter but that will make it more valuable for your audience. It is important that you cite sources from your research in the newsletter articles.

2. Simple and easy to read format.

Use a font (size and type) that is easy to read. Consider using a slightly larger font if your target audience is older. Make sure the format is easy to follow. When possible keep the complete article on one page so that people do not have to search for the remaining paragraphs on the topic. Black text is always best unless you are trying to highlight a few words. Some people have difficulties in seeing certain colors so black type is always best. Make sure your vocabulary is concise and comprehensible so that everyone of all reading levels can easily understand the content.

3. Use Interesting Headlines and Pictures.

Use action verbs and write dynamic headlines that grabs the attention of your audience. A picture next to a headline might be the best combination because the picture will grab the attention of your reader and the headline will sell them on the idea that this is must read information. Without an interesting headline, readers may skim over articles. It is also important that articles with more than a few paragraphs have sub-headings to help break up the text.

4. Have your information accurate, timely, and engaging.

Include a variety of topics and sections that will make your newsletter more interesting to a larger audience. It is best to split your topics equally among activities and news that has occurred since the last newsletter and new items that will be coming up before your next publication date. A calendar of events is always welcome in a newsletter. Above all else, make sure the information you provide in your newsletter is accurate.

5. A table of contents is helpful.

A table of contents is very helpful. This can be placed on a side bar or in a small section. Having a table of contents turns the newsletter into a resource that people know they can easily grab and find the information relevant to them now.

6. Grammar and Spelling are important.

After writing your articles, proofread for typos and edit all articles for consistency of writing style. If multiple people have contributed, make sure that the entire newsletter has the same tone and writing style. Always have multiple people proofread for spelling and grammar. Once you believe you have edited enough, go over it one more time.

These six keys will help you develop and deliver a quality newsletter that will make your
organization the envy of the community.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

5 Stages of Becoming a Fiction Writer – (A bit of Humor mixed with Truth)

Every aspiring writer sets out to write the great novel that will make him or her famous. You
may be on this journey yourself so let us prepare you with a review of the five stages you will go through on this journey.

Stage 1 – Being the Invincible Writer with the most fabulous story.

You begin the journey knowing that you have the best idea for a story ever to be told. You tell everyone about this book. Your phone calls go unanswered as your friends avoid listening to you tell them about your great book idea. In this stage you are euphoric, happy, and spend hours writing the outline and smirking about the plot twists and turns you are devising. You can already imagine the royalties, movie offers, and red carpet treatment you will receive once your book is published. Hold onto this feeling for as long as you can, because the next stage gets a
bit rough.

Stage 2 – Paranoia that your characters are out to get you.

As you enter Stage 2, you find that the plot has a few holes. You begin having your characters help fix the plot and then all of a sudden you find out that one is mortally injured. How did that happen? What are you going to do know? You begin to look back and try to figure out how your character misled you. At this stage you begin speaking to your characters (some authors go so far as to yell at these fictional people). You imagine that your characters are plotting against you and have no idea the level of greatness you will achieve as a writer. In some cases, you go back and delete that character completely or you find ways to bring her back from the brink of death and the best part – you expect her to be thankful to you for the rest of the book. Characters are characters. The darn book would be easy to write if all the characters behaved.

Stage 3 – I just want to finish this story.

At this stage in writing your first book, you are exhausted. Maybe you are still working the day job to pay your bills and all you want is one more weekend to finish this book. You are losing sleep, spend all the weekend in sweat pants, and your friends wonder if you are still alive. At this point, you throw the plot out the window and write rapidly to make it to the end. You have now become the speedwriter with one goal in mind: writing the words “THE END.”
Stage 4- I hate my Editor.

The book is finally complete and you realize it might be good to have an editor look this over. You have poured your heart and soul into this book and re-written sentences and used the grammar lessons from Ms. Clark, your fourth grade teacher. You email the book to your editor who turns it around in 48 hours and you open the edited file…and begin to cry. Eight hundred and twenty-seven changes and 47 comments later you realize now that you hate your editor more than your characters. The editor asked questions about the plot and how a character made it back from near death, not to mention changing all your punctuation.

Stage 5 – Please Mom just buy a copy and I will never ask you again for anything.

Finally, after making it through the edits and getting the final book in perfect form, it is
published. Maybe you have chosen traditional publishing or gone out on your own and used
self-publishing. Either way you sit back and get ready for all the good feelings you dreamed of in Stage 1. Eight days later, with no sales reported just yet, you call your mom and have the following conversation.

Author “Hi Mom…do you have a minute or two?”
Mom “Of course dear.”
Author “Mom, I promise to never ask for anything again and you will be the best mom in the world if you do me this one favor.”
Mom “What do you need dear?”
Author “Would you please purchase a copy of my book?”
Mom “You wrote a book?”
end conversation

For all you aspiring authors, this is just a bit of humor to help you through the process. Many of us have walked this path already. We know you will succeed. Keep smiling, keep writing, and know that you are not alone on the journey. In the end, the joy is in becoming a writer with a published book…welcome to the club.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

iBooks Spotlight Roundup

We love the iBooks spotlight. It’s an Apple newsletter that features new and noteworthy books. It’s a great way to discover the next book on your reading list. We rounded up some recent books iBooks highlighted:

Screen Shot 2015-05-27 at 5.24.41 PM

 Set for July release, “To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper Lee is back at it.

Gabriel Allon is on the hunt for the murderer of a controversial British Royal.

Renowned blogger and video blogger, Felicia Day, releases her endearing memoir.

A brand new Thunder Point romance where emotions run high.

Screen Shot 2015-05-27 at 5.26.30 PM

 

 

 

Click either banner for more iBooks picks and info on those featured!

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS